International Advisory Board

The International Advisory Board of the Institute for Political Studies is constituted by the following members:


“This strikes me as a very attractive project, and I am honored to have been asked to chair an International Advisory Board that will provide it with oversight and guidance.”

Marc Plattner, President of the International Advisory Board 

Co-editor of the Journal of Democracy. Vice-President for research and studies at the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). Co-director of the International Forum for Democratic Studies.  He served as NED's director of program from 1984 to 1989. During the 2002–2003 academic year he was a visiting professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. He has previously been a Fellow at the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina (1983–84); Advisor on Economic and Social Affairs at the United States Mission to the United Nations (1981–83); program officer at the Century Foundation (formerly the Twentieth Century Fund), a private foundation in New York City (1975–81); and managing editor of The Public Interest, a quarterly journal on public policy (1971–75). Dr. Plattner graduated summa cum laude from Yale University and received his Ph.D. in government from Cornell University, where his principal area of study was political philosophy. Over the past decade and a half, he has coedited more than fifteen books on contemporary issues relating to democracy.


“I feel honored to join such a prestigious Board”

Martin Bútora

Founder and Honorary President of the Institute for Public Affairs and Program Director of 'European Integration and Transatlantic Relations' Program. Ambassador of Slovak Republic to the United States (1999-2003). In November 1989, he was one of the founders of the political movement Public Against Violence. In the period of 1990- 1992 he held a position of a Human Rights Advisor to the President Václav Havel. He taught at Charles University in Prague (where he holds a position of Professor Habilis since 1992) and at the Department of Political Science, Trnava University (1993 - 1998). In 1999 National Endowment for Democracy has awarded him Democracy Service Medal; in 2000 he received Ján Papánek medal; and in 2002 a Celebration of Freedom Award by the American Jewish Committee. In the same year, he received the Order of Ludovít Štúr for his contribution to defense of human rights and development of civil society.


Larry Diamond 

Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, where he also directs the Center for Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law.  He is the founding co-editor of the Journal of Democracy and also serves as Senior Consultant at the International Forum for Democratic Studies of the National Endowment for Democracy.   During 2002–3, he served as a consultant to the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and was a contributing author of its report Foreign Aid in the National Interest. During the first three months of 2004, Diamond served as a senior adviser on governance to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad. During 2004–5, was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations' Independent Task Force on United States Policy toward Arab Reform. With Abbas Milani, he coordinates the Hoover Institution Project on Democracy in Iran. At Stanford University, Diamond is also professor by courtesy of political science and sociology.  He teaches courses on comparative democratic development and post-conflict democracy building, and advises many Stanford students.


Gabriel Calzada

Gabriel is president of Universidad Francisco Marroquín, the pioneering free market university founded in 1971 in Guatemala. He is also president of the Association of Private Enterprise Education and board member of Rising Tide Foundation and the Mont Pelerin Society. In his native Spain, he was founding president of Juan de Mariana Institute, one of the most influential think tanks in Europe and two-time recipient of Atlas Network’s Templeton Freedom Award. His 2008 study on the negative impact of the Spanish government’s promotion of “green jobs” reverberated around the world. The Spanish legislature reversed subsidies in place since 1996. In the U.S., Obama was hailing Spain as the model to emulate. The study, picked up by Fox, Glenn Beck, and John Stossel, along with Gabriel’s testimony before the U.S. Congress helped stop that initiative in its tracks. Gabriel also specializes in value investing and the Austrian business cycle and defense economics. 

“I would be honored and delighted to join you on this initiative”

 Paul Flather

Director of Special Programmes, EUROPAEUM. Fellow of Mansfield College, Oxford. He is was formerly a journalist specialising in education, working for the BBC, Times newspapers, and the New Statesman where he was deputy editor. His research has focussed on Indian politics since 1947, and more recently on anti-corruption strategies. He worked with underground dissident movements in Central Europe in the 1980s, and with race equality groups in the UK, and remains involved with many charities and civic bodies. He was an elected Member of the London Council in the 1980s (chairing the London-wide Committee on Post-School Education). He worked for the Open Society Foundation and was founding Secretary-General & CEO of the Central European University, originally set up in Budapest, Prague and Warsaw, by George Soros after the 1989 revolutions. He was Director of international and external affairs at Oxford University for five years until 2000. He has served as a consultant to the EU and to the Indian government.


Ivan Krastev

Chair of the Board of the Centre for Liberal Strategies, Sofia, and permanent fellow at the IWM Institute of Human Sciences in Vienna. He is a founding board member of the European Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the advisory board of the ERSTE Foundation. He is also associate editor of Europe's World and a member of the editorial boards of journal Transit – Europäische Revue and Journal of Democracy.  He was the editor-in-chief of the Bulgarian edition of Foreign Policy (2005-2011). His latest books in English are The Anti-American Century, co-editors with Alan McPherson, (CEU Press, 2007) and Shifting Obsessions: Three Essays on the Politics of Anticorruption (CEU Press, 2004). Ivan Krastev is a co-author with Steven Holmes of a forthcoming book on Russian politics.


Bronislaw Misztal

Executive Director of the Permanent Secretariat for the Community of Democracies. He is Professor and Chair of Sociology at the Catholic University of America. He is also a former president of the Research Committee 48 on Social Movements, Social Change and Collective Action of the International Sociological Association (ISA). He has received a habilitated doctorate (Dr.hab.) and a Ph.D. in sociology from the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. He continued his post-graduate education at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales of Paris (Centre d’Etudes des Mouvements Sociaux). He has taught and conducted research at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, The Claremont Colleges, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Universite Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, University of Bremen, Universita Cattolica de Milano, Cornell University and Jagiellonian University. He has a variety of research interests including social movements and precipitated social change, as well as the economic and political underpinnings of macro-social processes. On these issues he has conducted studies in Cuba, France, Germany, Italy and Poland. He has directed a project of comparative research on patterns of social concern resulting from systemic and post-communist transformations in Central Europe. Currently he is working on two research projects: on the Concept of Good Society, and on Constructing Civil Society With Minimal Social Capital. Bronislaw Misztal will participate in Challenges for Global Peace and Democracy - Legacy and Visions of Professor Bronislaw Geremek.  


“It sounds an exciting venture, and I am honored to be invited to join its advisory board.”

Anthony O'Hear

Professor of Philosophy, University of Buckingham, Director of the Royal Institute of Philosophy and Editor of ‘Philosophy’. Books include Karl Popper (1980), Beyond Evolution (1997), After Progress (1999), Philosophy in the New Millennium (2001) and Plato’s Children (2006).


Aleksander Smolar

Aleksander Smolar is President of the Stefan Batory Foundation in Warsaw and also Senior Researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris. His essays and other writings have appeared in journals throughout Europe and the United States. Between 1971 and 1989, he was an active member of the Polish diaspora on behalf of opposition movements in his native Poland and other Eastern European countries. From 1989 to 1990, he was an advisor to the first democratically elected prime minister of Poland, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, and from 1992-1993, he served as advisor for foreign policy to Prime Minister Hanna Suchocka.


“It’s a great honor to be invited to join this board, and I gratefully accept.”
 

Clifford Orwin

Clifford Orwin is a Professor of Political Science, Fellow of St. Michael's College, and the Director of the Program in Political Philosophy and International Affairs at the University of Tor onto. He teaches the history of political thought, with emphasis on classical, early modern, and Jewish political thought.  Orwin is author of The Humanity of Thucydides (Princeton, 1994) and co-editor (with Nathan Tarcov) of The Legacy of Rousseau (University of Chicago Press, 1997). Current projects include articles on Herodotus, Montesquieu, Churchill, the Book of Esther, and the Jewish Hellenist Flavius Josephus, and a book for the general public on the role of compassion in modern political life and thought. He is editing (also with Nathan Tarcov) the late Allan Bloom's commentary on Rousseau's Emile.  Orwin received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University and his B.A. from Cornell University. He has taught as a visitor at Harvard, the University of Chicago, and Michigan State University, and has held briefer visitorships at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, Lisbon. He has served on the Panel on Political Science at the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington, and is himself the recipient of three NEH Fellowships. Orwin is the recipient of a Faculty of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award and a St. Michael's College Teacher of the Year Award.  


“I would be delighted to join the International Advisory Board which you envisage and look forward to being involved in its work.”

Lord Raymond Plant

Professor Raymond Plant joined the Dickson Poon School of Law in January 2002 as Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Philosophy. He was previously Master of St. Catherine's College Oxford from 1994 -2000 and before that, Professor of European Political Thought at the University of Southampton. He is a Labour Peer and sits in the House of Lords with the title of Lord Plant of Highfield. In the Lords he is a member of the Joint Committee on Human Rights and has been a member of the Government and Law Sub Committee of the Committee on the European Communities. He has given quite a few lecture series at a range of universities: The Agnes Cumming Lectures at University College Dublin; the Sarum Lectures at Oxford University; The Stanton Lectures (twice) at Cambridge University; the Ferguson Lectures at Manchester University; the Scott Holland Lectures at Manchester University; The Stevenson Lectures at Glasgow University. In 2006 he was given the Boutwood Lectures in Cambridge on "The Neo Liberal State and the Rule of Law" and in 2007 the Bampton Lectures at Oxford University on Religion,Citizenship and Liberal Pluralism. In 2005 he has given the G.Ganz Lecture at Southampton University on "Reflections on the Rule of Law in the UK". He is a member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. He is a Fellow of St Catherine's College Oxford; of Harris Manchester College Oxford and in 2006 of Corpus Christi College Cambridge. In 2010, Lord Plant was awarded the annual Sir Isaiah Berlin Prize for Lifetime Contribution to Political Studies. Professor Raymond PLANT is a philosopher and has written mainly on political, social and legal philosophy.


“It would be an honor and a delight to serve on the Advisory Board. “

Susan Shell

Susan Shell is the author of Kant and the Limits of Autonomy (Harvard University Press, 2009), The Embodiment of Reason: Kant on Spirit, Generation and Community (University of Chicago Press, (1996), The Rights of Reason: A Study of Kant's Philosophy and Politics (University of Toronto Press, 1980). She is also the co-editor (with Robert Faulkner) of America at Risk: Threats to Liberal Self-Government in an Age of Uncertainty (University of Michigan Press, 2009). She has also written on Rousseau, German Idealism, and selected areas of public policy. She has been a Visiting Professor at Harvard University, and received fellowships from The National Endowment for the Humanities, The American Council of Learned Societies, The Bradley Foundation, the Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst and the Radcliffe Institute. She is currently Chair of the Department of Political Science.


Zdzislaw Mach

Zdzislaw Mach is professor in sociology and anthropology at the Jagiellonian University. Founder and of the Institute for European Studies at the Jagiellonian University, and one of the main authors of the European Studies curriculum in Poland. He has broad international teaching experience from Europe and America. Previous teaching and research appointments include Université Montpellier IIII Paul Valéry, University of Exeter, University College Dublin, University of Chicago, Oxford University, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, the American Council of Learned Societies, University of Edinburgh and St. John's College, Oxford. His research interests cover identity issues such as nationalism, minorities and ethnicity, the development of European citizenship, migration and the reconstruction of identity, the ethnic origin of a nation and construction of identities as well as the development of the idea of Europe.


Jany János

Jany János is the head of Institute of International Studies and Political Science of the Pázmány Peter Catholic University in Budapest. His field of research focuses on the Middle East, particularly on Iran, her legal, religious and social history, on the legal cultures of the Middle East and Central Asia in general, and their comparative analysis in particular. He is a member of the Public Body of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and works as an advisor to the Hungarian Accreditation Committee.


James W. Muller 

James W. Muller is professor of political science at the University of Alaska, Anchorage, is a by-fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge, academic chairman of the Churchill Centre, and  a recipient of the Farrow Award for Excellence in Churchill Studies. He is editor of The Revival of Constitutionalism, Churchill as Peacemaker, and Churchill’s “Iron Curtain” Speech Fifty Years Later. He is also editor of the new editions of Churchhill's Thoughts and Adventures and Great Contemporaries, both available from ISI Books.